Fri, Feb 17, 2017 Works by Igor Stravinsky, Peter Evans and Guest Improvisors

Posted by April 14, 2016

On Stage Series

In our On Stage series we bring to the stage some of the most influential national and international contemporary classical composers of the 20th and 21st centuries

 

 

Fri, Feb 17, 2017
Venue: Herbst Theatre 401 Van Ness Ave, San Francisco, CA 94102

Free and open to the public
4:00 – 4:30 pm Open Dress Rehearsal of Stravinksy Interpolations with improvisor, trumpeter Peter Evans
4:30 – 5:30 pm Composer Talk with Peter Evans facilitated by Steven Schick

Open to ticket-holders
6:45 pm  Pre-concert discussion with Steven Schick and musicians
7:30 pm  CONCERT

Eventbrite - Works by Richard Festinger, Michael Pisaro, Kate Soper, and Gyorgy Ligeti   $35/$15 students

In a departure from the usual way of presenting Stravinsky’s iconic L’Histoire du Soldat, now approaching its centennial, we will replace the dramatic action and much of the original Ramuz text with improvised interpolations featuring trumpet virtuoso supreme, Peter Evans, who will lead an extraordinary group of Bay Area improvisers, including special guests Ritwik Banerji, Nava Dunkelman, and India Cooke. The result will be an Evans/Stravinsky mash-up in which two musics will speak to each other across a century—responding and resonating, cajoling and interrupting—in a conversation about the eternal issues of good and evil; war and peace.

Igor Stravinsky L’Histoire du Soldat (1918) 
Hrabba Atladottir, violin; Richard Worn, bass; Jeff Anderle, clarinet; Dana Jessen, bassoon; Brad Hogarth, trumpet; Brendan Lai-Tong, trombone; Christopher Froh, percussion

Peter Evans Improvised Interpolations of L’Histoire du Soldat (2016)
Peter Evans, trumpet (soloist); Kyle Bruckmann, oboe; William Winant, percussion; Steve Schick, percussion; Ritwik Banerji, saxophone; Nava Dunkelman, percussion; India Cooke, violin


About Peter Evans

With Peter Evans on Trumpet, Only the Shape Is Familiar
New York Times

His reputation among freethinking trumpet players is ironclad, a function of superhuman precision and a trailblazing technical vocabulary. But Mr. Evans would rather not be known strictly on those merits. “Sometimes it bothers me that the physical intensity and the crazy sounds are what people focus on,” he said a couple of weeks after his concert, over coffee near the carousel in Bryant Park. “Actually that’s not really the point for me.” Mr. Evans, 35, has the look of a systems analyst and the instinct of a righteous outlier, questioning preconceptions at every turn.

Growing up outside of Boston, he studied classical music alongside jazz, a pattern he continued at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music. He was serious about solo trumpet performance even then, drawing from both contemporary composers like Luciano Berio and boundless improvisers like the trumpeter Bill Dixon. “I moved to New York in 2003, and that’s one of the few things I had that was ready to go,” Mr. Evans said. “I didn’t know anybody, but I could sit down at some coffee shop and play a solo set.”

The jazz trumpeter and composer Dave Douglas was among those who quickly noticed Mr. Evans, commissioning him to perform on the Festival of New Trumpet Music. “The kinds of things he was doing, hardly anybody was doing,” Mr. Douglas said. “He has now further developed those techniques into some sounds that are wholly his own. That doesn’t happen too often.” >> Read full New York Times article